Wednesday, November 28, 2012

More Holton Frames






Here are more paintings from the upcoming Holton Show. 

Not only do Tim Holton's beautiful frames really enhance my paintings, I'm also truly appreciating the term "custom framing" 

You see, in crafting these frames, every decision along the process - from selecting the type of wood, the grain, texture, color... everything! – is made specifically for each painting. If you look at the above frame, for example, and notice how the grain pattern on the bottom seem to echo and continue the waterway's path in my painting, that's not an accident. That piece of wood was selected specifically for that purpose.




The lighter finish and the carved texture on this one echoes the colors and the paint stroke quality in the painting. That's not an accident either. Tim didn't just pick a moulding off a shelf, he carved it in response to the painting. That's custom framing.








I love how the textured double row on the inside part of the frame echoes the two eucalypti, surrounded by the smooth sky. Coincidence? No, it's design.







If you'll look at each of the pieces in my previous post, you'll notice the decisions Tim made for each painting. Sometimes they're about color, sometimes they're about patterns, and sometimes they're about texture. Sometimes, it's about things that I, as the painter, don't even know to think about, but the frame maker considers with great care and attention. Often it's readily visible. Other times, the effect is much subtler. But it all adds up to a beautiful and thoughtful presentation of each painting as a unique piece of art.

I can't wait to see what Tim did to Erik's paintings!



Terry Miura & Erik Tiemens
New California Landscapes

5515 Doyle Street, Emerymille, CA

Opening Reception: Saturday, December 1st, 4 - 6pm




See you at the opening!



5 comments:

  1. I am in love with #031.jpg (title?) Did you paint it near the slough? Looks like it could be there, with the sparse clusters of eucalyptus surrounded by wetlands.

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  2. Terry—

    You explain the idea perfectly! Every frame alive to the picture, sustaining its spirit into the architectural realm.

    Thank you for a terrific post. Looking forward to seeing you tomorrow. The show is gorgeous!

    —Tim

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  3. Sergio, it's out of my head. But the inspiration came from the area west of Lodi, where Sandhill Cranes come to spend the winters.

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  4. Thanks Tim! The show came together beautifully!

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  5. Huh, I had never realized any of these things about the frames. I'm very impressed to see how much thought and craftsmanship is put into these frames.

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